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Substrate mix with coco peat is more airy and responds faster

Substrate mix with coco peat is more airy and responds faster
Kalanchoe grower Jan van Luijk of Poeldijk, the Netherlands, has for many
years been using a mixture of white peat and coco peat. Together with a
few fellow growers he is committed to bringing the pot kalanchoe to a higher
level. In order to obtain more information about the substrates, the growers
group has participated in master classes on the subject.

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Coir helps drive expansion in soft fruit

Mr Adams sources coir in various formats – compressed bagged ‘slabs’ which may be washed or buffered, blocks for pot production, and sometimes loose – and from a range of suppliers, including Dutch Plantin which has recently appointed the agronomy company Agrii as its UK distributor.

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Major water and fertilizer savings attainable for tomato crops grown on DP Optima™ coco slabs

In greenhouse trials carried out over the course of 2011 at the facilities of PlantResearch in Made, the Netherlands, the DP Optima TM double layer coco slabs from Dutch Plantin were found to require 10 to 20% less water and fertilizer feed than rock wool slabs of similar dimensions, while still producing the same tomato yield. This would not only make coco slabs well suited for areas where water is a limiting factor in horticultural production, it also provides sustainability benefits in horticultural advanced regions such as Europe or North America.

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What about the availability of coco peat?

How can we explain the shortage of coco-pith although there are so many plantations? We can find more than 10 million ha of coconut plantations worldwide, which (theoretically) should be able to provide us yearly with enough raw material to produce 80 million m3 of coco-pith. Fer Weerheijm from Dutch Plantin conducts the investigation.

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Gerbera cultivation on coir with recirculation of the nutrient solution: a comparison with rockwool culture.

Abstract – An experiment with Gerbera ‘Aurelia’ was set up to evaluate flower production and flower stem quality in an open and a closed growing system. For both systems two substrates, coir and rockwool, were evaluated.

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Cocos as a growing medium

Plant and flower growers in The Netherlands have discovered that – environmental considerations aside – it makes good commercial sense to find viable, alternative growing media to peat. They have, therefore, welcomed coconut-fibre (coir) compost as a new soil conditioner. Especially in the pot plant sector, cocos is experiencing explosive development in its use as a substrate. However, because its application in this field is relatively new, some caution is called for.

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One Dutch rose grower steps off the “more production is better” treadmill

Do you want to make more money? Then increase production volume through new varieties, higher efficiency or expansion. So has gone the thinking among Dutch growers for years. But in the end it is not how many seems or pots you produce that matters, it is how much money you keep by the end of the day. Unfortunately for too many growers the only clear road they see leading to higher profits is more and more production volume. For these growers, volume is equal to success.

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Numerous options when considering a growing medium

Most growing media (substrates) can be used for a great variety of crops. This is probably the reason why at present so many types are in use. Some crops are only grown on a limited number of media. The reason for this is not always the fact that the medium has a higher performance but growers with the same crop tend to copy systems from each other.

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Dutch Plantin India RHP certified

Dutch Plantin, a producer of coir pith and coir fibre has received RHP certification for its production facilities in India. This follows a complete audit regarding land of origin, storage, production and quality. RHP quality marks are awarded to producers, traders and importers of peat products, potting soil formulas, substrates, soil supply and soil improvement materials who meet stringent guidelines regarding chemical treatment.

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Increasing use of coir

The use of coconuts in various industries virtually guarantees the supply of coir, a substrate which is finding increased popularity with growers around the world. Rose growers in the Netherlands were one of the first to use coir pith professionally when they had to change from soil to a sub strate in the 1908s due to severe infections in the soil. Even then the Dutch government prohibited the use of chemical soil sterilisation methods. Coir turned out to be a useful substrate due to the quick strike of the roots and the fast development of the plant. Today about one third of the 900 ha of roses grown professionally in the Netherlands is on coir.

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Coir pith: life story of a substrate

Coir pith as an organic substrate was introduced in the eighties. Rose growers were the first to use it professionally. It started with small tests in greenhouses and at research stations with promising results. Within a few years it was accepted widely as a suitable substrate. The quick strike of roots and the fast development have not gone unnoticed. Besides, the specific properties like water containing capacity, pH buffer and stable physical structure were reasons for a successful introduction.

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UK says ‘no’ to peat- what’s the alternative?

An initiative started in 2003 in the Netherlands to study the feasibility of growing pot plants in substrates containing less, or no peat at all. The chain-wide project ‘New Growing Media’ returned some surprising results: some pot plants even grew better in less peat substrates; coir turned out to be the most favourite replacement.

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Growing media: developments and grower choice

In conversation with three growing media supply companies at the IPM Essen, it is apparent that the demand for potting soil and substrates for ornamentals is increasing but, growers should be persuaded to seek expert advice.

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Quality has no borders under RHP

Potting soils and substrates are not beautiful like flowers and plants but their quality is reflected in the uniformity and quality of crops. Consistency in economic returns across all the square metres in a greenhouse requires good crop management and the right choice of growing media.

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Substrate analysis – best choice for coir

In the protected cultivation of ornamental crops, the use of artificial substrates continues to grow worldwide. Each growing media has its own specific characteristics. Production protocols therefore vary according to the substrate used. Among the preferred materials are rockwool and coir – two substrates that illustrate perfectly the need for a different management approach, especially when making an analysis for fertilizer recommendations.

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When lifespan is prolonged by ageing!

Earlier issues of FCI have indicated the growing interest among growers on all continents to adapt their production to soil-less systems. Growing media products originating from coir are currently recognised to be in strong demand since supplies of sphagnum peat in Europe have been hampered by last year’s wet summer. Growers using coir should be aware of some ìinvisibleî factors that determine the quality of this particular media.

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Running in Berlin for education in India!

Dutch Plantin and Van Doren Engineers are putting their best foot forward! On Sunday 28 September 2014, our five-man team will be running the Berlin Marathon. Our aim? To put in a remarkable sports performance and to raise money for charity: education for children in India.

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From coconut to cocopeat

There are many suppliers of cocopeat all over the world and they all will claim to have the best product. Some of them will be realize what they promise. But there are exceptions. To make a better judgement, it is good to be aware of the essential parts of the production process of cocopeat. – Uko Reinders

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‘Substrate mix with coco peat is more airy and responds faster’

Kalanchoe grower Jan van Luijk of Poeldijk, the Netherlands, has for many years been using a mixture of white peat and coco peat. Together with a few fellow growers he is committed to bringing the pot kalanchoe to a higher level. In order to obtain more information about the substrates, the growers group has participated in master classes on the subject.

Download

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